April is Alcohol Awareness Month National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism NIAAA

drug and alcohol awareness month

The Office of National Drug Control Policy joins President Obama in celebrating National Substance Abuse Prevention Month and encourages prevention efforts this month and all year long to ensure the health of teens and young adults. A big part of the work of Alcohol Awareness Month is to point out the stigma that still surrounds alcoholism and substance abuse in general. March is National Alcohol and Drug Fact Awareness Month, a time when partners of the coalition come together to help advance the science and address youth drug and alcohol use in communities and nationwide. At the same time, alcohol-related problems are among the most significant public health issues in the country. Alcohol use disorder (AUD) affects about 15 million adults in the United States, and an estimated 88,000 people die from alcohol-related causes annually, making alcohol the third leading preventable cause of death in the nation.

Its primary goal is increasing public awareness and education about alcohol and alcohol use disorder (AUD), formerly known as “alcoholism”. NIAAA’s wealth of research-based resources can help cut through the clutter and get at the heart of the issues around alcohol misuse. Whether you are seeking more information about what AUD is, are thinking about cutting back on alcohol, are a parent looking for information about how to talk to your kids about alcohol, or a health care professional looking for how to serve your patients, NIAAA can help. National Drug and Alcohol Facts Week® (NDAFW), an annual health observance, connects youth with resources about drugs, alcohol, and related health topics. Programs like Alcohol Awareness Month exist to ensure that families and communities have the resources, information, and options available to control the crisis of alcoholism. Alcohol Awareness Month is held every April to help spread awareness about the dangers of alcohol and the causes of and treatments for alcohol use disorder.

What month is Alcohol Awareness Month?

Teens that are interested in hosting events must partner with an adult who meets this criterion (including your parents!). Click here to learn more about going to rehab for alcohol use or the difference between inpatient and outpatient programs. Whether you are looking for counseling, peer support groups, accountability, or recovery tools you can pull up on your phone, you have options. Events may aim to raise awareness or funds for rehabilitation centers in their area or to fight the stigma that often comes with addiction.

  1. This year, the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) and the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) will be hosting the 10th annual National Drug and Alcohol Facts Week (NDAFW) from March 30 through April 5, 2020.
  2. With this in mind, Alcohol Awareness Month gives public health bodies, community centers, and treatment facilities the chance to increase their efforts to reach people who may not fully appreciate the dangers of unhealthy alcohol consumption.
  3. I also encourage you to take a close look at Rethinking Drinking and the Alcohol Treatment Navigator to learn more about AUD and how to find quality care to address it.

The NIAAA Alcohol Treatment Navigator can help you recognize and find high quality treatment for alcohol use disorder. If you drink excessively, seek medical help to plan a safe recovery as sudden abstinence can be life threatening. NIAAA’s Rethinking Drinking can help you assess your drinking habits are toads poisonous to humans vet-approved safety facts and faq and provides information to help you cut back or stop drinking. The NCADD encourages people to participate by wearing red ribbons, talking with kids and teens about alcohol, hosting dry parties, having conversations with friends and family about drinking, and having an alcohol-free weekend.

Alcohol Awareness Month is a public health program organized by the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence as a way of increasing outreach and education regarding the dangers of alcoholism and issues related to alcohol. The program was started in April 1987 with the intention of targeting college-aged students who might be drinking too much as part of their newfound freedom. It has since become a national movement to draw more attention to the causes and effects of alcoholism as well as how to help families and communities deal with drinking problems.

National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)

National Drug and Alcohol Facts Week®, or NDAFW, is an annual health observance that inspires dialogue about the science of drug use and addiction among youth. It provides an opportunity to bring together scientists, students, educators, healthcare providers, and community partners to help advance the science and address youth drug and alcohol use in communities and nationwide. It was launched in 2010 by scientists at the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) to stimulate educational events in communities so teens can learn what science has taught us about drug use and addiction. The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism became a partner in 2016, and alcohol has been added as a topic area for the week.

Please send an email to with information about your event, the dates, and any questions you may have. If you recognize any of these symptoms in yourself, it’s time to rethink the role that alcohol plays in your life. NIAAA has some interactive resources to help you examine your drinking patterns further and, if needed, recognize and search for quality care. As a subsidiary of American Addiction Centers, a nationwide provider of treatment facilities, Alcohol.org will also be showcasing the cost alcoholism and addiction can have on your life throughout the entire month of April.

The National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence (NCADD) sponsors Alcohol Awareness Month, which has been observed since 1987. Alcohol Awareness Month is dedicated to increasing public knowledge about the dangers of alcohol and the effects and causes of alcohol use disorder. Millions of Americans suffer from substance abuse, which includes underage drinking, alcohol dependency, non-medical use of prescription drugs, abuse of over-the-counter medications, and illicit drug use.

Two such resources are smokefree.gov and teen.smokefree.gov as well as lung.org N-O-T (Not on tobacco) program which is directed by the American Lung Association. As I discussed in my previous blog post, NIAAA also has an important new website that can help you navigate the often complicated process of choosing treatment for alcohol problems. All Americans are encouraged to participate in Alcohol Awareness Month by reflecting on their relationship with alcohol. This month, join a conversation with Dr. Jessica Hoffman of the UNC Bowles Center on Alcohol Studies, and Bryan Torres, a Cedar Ridge High School student working with the Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention Team (ADAPT).

drug and alcohol awareness month

All approved events will be displayed on the Events Map within 2 weeks of submitting the registration form. Even if there aren’t local events, there are several ways you can participate in raising awareness. Throughout National Substance Abuse Prevention Month, ONDCP will orchestrate Federal prevention activities and support participation in the observance within states and communities. These numbers suggest that problematic alcohol use continues to plague our society, and awareness about addiction and its harmful effects on our lives, is necessary in order to protect our loved ones and selves. Recognizing that you want to change your relationship with alcohol is a big step, and it can be overwhelming to think about the next steps, such as treatment. During National Drug and Alcohol Facts Week® and year round, teens can test their knowledge about drugs, alcohol, and drug use by taking the interactive National Drug and Alcohol IQ Challenge quiz.

With this in mind, Alcohol Awareness Month gives public health bodies, community centers, and treatment facilities the chance to increase their efforts to reach people who may not fully appreciate the dangers of unhealthy alcohol consumption. During the month, the NCADD and other national public health organizations encourage community organizations and healthcare professionals to hold events and offer alcohol-related education materials. Binge drinking is often thought of as a rite of passage, and many fraternities the irrational mind of addicts and alcoholics and sororities use alcohol in hazing rituals that often turn deadly. College administrations and state governments are turning to “creative prevention strategies” to address the epidemic, and Alcohol Awareness Month gives them the platform to spread the message. This year, the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) and the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) will be hosting the 10th annual National Drug and Alcohol Facts Week (NDAFW) from March 30 through April 5, 2020.

We’ll be helping give a real glimpse into how it can affect your mental and physical health, financial well-being, relationships (family and friends), and what it could mean for your current and future career. Awareness areas include alcohol use risks, AUD treatments, AUD prevention, and the effects of alcohol misuse on individuals, families, and communities. Share information with your family and friends that will inspire dialogue about preventing youth drug and alcohol use.

The Importance of Alcohol Awareness Month

Prevention strategies targeting the root of the problem are essential to curb drug use and help people lead healthier lives. Early intervention helps prevent substance abuse and reduce the negative consequences of addiction before they occur. Through community-based efforts involving youth, parents, educators, and government officers, we can strengthen the support systems that deter our Nation’s young people from drug consumption and improve both academic performance and workforce readiness.

This Alcohol Awareness Month is a great opportunity to update your knowledge about alcohol, alcohol use disorder, and their impacts on health and society. Alcohol-related problems continue to exact an immense toll on individuals, families, and communities. In the United States, more than 140,000 people per year die from alcohol misuse, making it one of the leading causes of preventable deaths. Alcohol misuse is linked to more than 200 disease and injury-related conditions, meaning alcohol misuse contributes substantially to health care costs and lost productivity and affects people’s health in ways that they may not realize. I also encourage you to take a close look at Rethinking Drinking and the Alcohol Treatment Navigator to learn more about AUD and how to find quality care to address it. This October marks the second annual National Substance Abuse Prevention Month – an observance to highlight the vital role of substance abuse prevention in both individual and community health and to remember those who have lost their lives to substance abuse.

Wellness Wednesday: National Alcohol and Drug Fact Awareness Week

Full of educational events across the week, NDAFW will focus on educating teens and families on the myths of substance abuse and addiction with the help on industry experts. Youth.gov is the U.S. government website that helps you create, maintain, and strengthen effective youth programs. Included are youth facts, funding information, and tools to help you assess community assets, generate maps of local and federal resources, search for evidence-based youth programs, and keep up-to-date on the latest, youth-related news. We understand it may not be possible for some event planners to hold events during the week of NDAFW. Registered activities held any time in the same month as the week of NDAFW can be recognized as NDAFW events. Make sure to register your event, have it listed on the Events Map, or promote it as an NDAFW event.

Alcohol and Public Health

NIDA and NIAAA are part of the National Institutes of Health, and work with leading organizations, media outlets, and other Government agencies to spread the word about NDAFW. Participate in National Drug and Alcohol Facts Week® (NDAFW) and help share facts about drugs, alcohol, and addiction in your community. NDAFW is an annual health observance that inspires dialogue about the science alcohol poisoning of drug use and addiction among youth. NDAFW provides an opportunity to bring together scientists, students, educators, healthcare providers, and community partners to help advance the science and address youth drug and alcohol use in communities and nationwide. Sign up for NDAFW email updates below, and find lots of great resources for planning and promoting your very own NDAFW event.